Sequoia National Park by Barbara Edwards

entering the park
entering the park

Sequoia Ntl Park- first day

44 degrees this morning. The roads in the park don’t allow for anything over 22 feet long so we made it perfectly.

 

 

see the road ahead, that tiny line
see the road ahead, that tiny line

Hairpin turns, steep angles and grades, narrow lanes all are here. Mostly there are tenters in camp last night. The big rigs can’t get any further into the park.

 

 

 

gorgeous view
gorgeous view

It’s eight am and 45 as we head up the trail to Moro Rock and the best view of Mount Whitney, the highest peak in the lower forty-eight states.

The road is narrow with a deep gorge down to the river. And I mean 400 feet or more down.

 

in the tree
in the tree

Hairpin turns challenge my husband’s driving skill, but I trust him totally. He’d be confident with our 35 foot fifth-wheel.

 

 

 

I can’t count the times we stop to take photo after photo. His fancy camera’s battery goes dead and I have to use my old stand-by.

Sequoia grove
Sequoia grove

It isn’t as clear on landscape, but it loves the Sequoia trees. They look red in the sunlight. So tall I get dizzy looking for the tops.

 

 

 

A fallen giant
A fallen giant

I’m so embarrassed that I have run out of descriptive words. A fellow hiker crowed how he felt overwhelmed and I agreed.

 

 

 

Giant meadow
Giant meadow

We walked among trees that were thousands of years old. Touched them. I got teary eyed. I want all my family to see what I’ve seen.

Still forty-five when we drive down the mountains. In low gear to save the brakes, with my heart in my mouth. The curves are worse when you can look forward and see over the low abutment. Not everywhere has a guard rail and the drop is right there at the edge of the pavement on a lane ten feet wide.

A tired camper, bearly there
A tired camper, bearly there

We had lunch at the Waskula Lodge. It was good food and a beautiful setting. Our waitress is working there for the summer until December, using a tiny bungalo for the help that is three minutes walk away. What a place to stay! I recognized Lupines, Daisies, Honeysuckle, and wanted to know the names of several others.

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Author: Barbara Edwards

Riveting Romance with an Edge

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